#trainingformy40s

‪reck·less /rekləs/ adj. without thinking about the consequences. rash, heedless, impetuous, impulsive, daredevil, audacious, madcap‬

Category: Running (page 1 of 15)

I am a Runner

  
I’ve been what I would call a ‘runner’ for 11 years this month. While my wife was pregnant with my oldest son I gained about 25 sympathy pounds. After his birth my wife looked at me and said, ‘I was pregnant, so I gained baby weight and I’m not pregnant anymore… what are you going to do?’ So I started running. And kinda like Forest Gump, I never stopped. But after 11 years of running, I completed my first ever tempo run. While I have run often and far, I realized I was a lazy runner, running for distance and not really caring about the pace. Not anymore. I’ve started a new training plan that is going to kick

my butt. But it will also get me ready to destroy my current half marathon pace. I’ve set my eyes on the Tomoka half marathon at the end of March. 

So today, as I ran my first ever tempo run I feel like I’m now beginning to train like a runner. Refine my skill and become better more efficient at it. 

I like running. 

Wisdom

  

It’s 8:30 on a Friday night and I’m on I-75 in the middle of South Georgia. Why?
I’m heading to north Georgia with two of my independent living youth. We are headed for the culmination of a mentoring program they started on the spring. It feels a little odd to be wrapping up the mentoring program I wasn’t really a part of. But tha s kind of how it goes. 

I have mixed feelings about being away from home this weekend. Without letting the cat out of the bag, there’s a lot going on back in Orlando. Ronda and I are in the midst of praying through a big situation for us. On one hand, I want to be there with her. One the other hand, I’m looking forward to the space and clarity that comes with spending a weekend in the woods. 

I suppose that means this weekend has a twofold purpose for me. To capstone the mentoring program and solidify my place in the lives of these youth as a mentor. And to allow God to speak to and mentor me this weekend. I have high hopes for this weekend. I’m trusting God won’t let me down. He doesn’t usually. 

The Celldweller song ‘The Last Firstborn’ is playing. That song always make me think of the Apostle Paul. He claimed his apostleship cake as one untimely born. I feel that way. Not that I’m an apostle, but that I often wonder about God’s choice to love me and use me to fulfill his purposes. But he does. And I believe this weekend he is going to teach me as much as he teaches these dudes with me. 

In some ways, I really need to hear God speak to me this weekend. I need it more than I have in quite some time. We started a new sermon series at church last week on the book of James. I’ve been reading it this week. In chapter 1, James says any who lacks wisdom should ask God in faith that he give generously to the obedient. That’s where j find myself. Asking for wisdom. Asking for God’s spirit of be upon me and inform my decision-making. I want to be a spirit-filled wise leader of the family and ministry God has trusted me with. 

This seems like a good place to close… God grant me your spirit of wisdom to be a wise leader of the people you have given to me. 

Admitting Defeat

  

I don’t admit defeat.

I don’t like defeat. I don’t like admitting I have been defeated.  I don’t like admitting I started a challenge I couldn’t finish. I especially don’t like admitting defeat when it highlights my shortcomings or inadequacies. 

Today, I admit defeat. I admit to biting off than I could chew. I ain’t to thinking more highly of my abilities than I should have. 

I endeavored to run 8 miles this morning. I made it to 3.3 before I completely bonked. There was just no gas left in the tank. I write this as I hang my head in shame walking the reminder 5 miles home. Luckily, I won’t have to because my wife is on her way to save me.  This experience has taught me a few cuable lessons about running, training and life. 

  1. You have to fuel your body. Now this may sound simple, but I’m notorious for not doing it. I didn’t eat or drink anything this morning before setting out to run. I have learned to be able to ‘compete’ at the level I want to, I need to take my nutrition and hydration seriously. Eat healthy. Drink water. Fuel my body appropriators the task at hand. This is true across all areas of life. You must prepare yourself appropriately for the task ahead of you. You have to be prepared to tackle the obstacles ahead. Pre-planning prevents poor performance. Or as I like to practice: piss poor planning provides piss poor performance. Fuel yourself for what you are doing. 
  2. You have to be realistic about your limits. Last Friday I had a minor surgery removing a mole or something. The doctor said to lay low for two weeks. Let the stitches heal and come out. Blah blah blah. I took a couple days off after I had been slowing down leading it the procedure. I then expected to jump back into a long run. I ran once or twice this week and last week and then expected I could pound out 8 miles unfueled. This wasn’t realistic. I should have planned a week or two of light running to get back to where I needed to be for an 8 miler. This is also true across life. Trying new things and pushing ourselves are fantastic ideas, but only after we have trained and prepared ourselves for what comes next. 
  3. You have to be serious. I have realized the best way to describe my approach to total fitness (training, running and eating) is undisciplined. I’m undisciplined. This is harder to admit than defeat. It’s hard to admit I love my life haphazardly, coming and going with whatever and not sticking to discipline. I’ve known this about myself for a year or so. I’ve been trying to work on it, but I still have a long way to go. I believe, being undisciplined is the main thing holding me back from doing incredible things in my life. Having order and organization feels rigid and robotic, but being disciplined allows for things to be accomplished, tasks to get completed and progress to be made. I’m making progress in becoming disciplined and slowly I’m seeing my life pull together. 

I admit defeat. I admit that an 8 mile run defeated me today. But I also admit, I have learned about myself and will be better equipped for the next one. 

What have you learned from times you’ve admitted defeat?

#trainingformy40s

  
Some time ago, I began to use #trainingformy40s when posting my training whether it was running, crossfit, weight training or hiking. Anything athletic or exercise or training related. I did this because I decided to take a long haul approach to my fitness. I have always trained in some way, never with any real purpose or meaning behind it. Never with a goal in mind. Never with anymore thought than I should do this.

When I train now, it is less haphazard and slightly more on purpose. I want to be interesting the best shape of my life physically, mentally and emotionally by the time I am 40. On my 40th birthday, I want to look back at my life and say, ‘I have never been healthier than I am at this moment!’
As we age, too often it seems we lose the many of the things we once had in our youth. I don’t want to be that way. I want to be better than I am now and when I was younger. I want to stand on the precipice of ‘the hill’ and as I begin my descent down, I want to be in my Prime. I want to face the second half of my life better prepared than I faced the first half.

For this to become reality, it takes determination, drive, discipline and sweat. It takes getting out of my comfort zone and forcing myself to train… especially when I don’t feel like it. It is about finding a routine of training that works to cover all aspects of what I want to accomplish. It is about getting my eating habits under control (the piece I’ve always struggled with).

It is about total health.

It is about discipline.

It is about 1 Corinthians 9:27 – but I discipline my body and make it my slave, so that, after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified.

17 Years

eli climbing

On Saturday (8/1), Ronda and I celebrated 17 years of marriage. I am not 100% sure if she knew what she was getting into when she married me… but I am glad she did. We have had our ups and downs and rough roads, but despite it all we love each other and have committed to work through whatever comes our way.

We celebrated this year by doing some activities that only strange, warped married couples would enjoy doing to celebrate…

We started the day off with an 8 mile run at 6:45am. Yes, we went running to celebrate.

Then I did yardwork. Then we cleaned the house.

After this, we went to a rock climbing gym.

We capped off the night with Greek food.

As you can see, we spent the day punishing ourselves by physically… this doesn’t seem right, but it’s what we did. They may seem like strange activities, but they are activities that are special to us. They are activities that speak to the core of our relationship. The first date I took Ronda on was to Mt. Currahee in north Georgia to go climbing and rappelling. We had a blast. We have continued to participate in outdoor, adventure type activities throughout our relationship. I believe it assists us in remaining together. We like the same things. We enjoy the same activities.

Mind you, this is the only ingredients in the recipe to last 17 years, but they are critical pieces. Since you asked, I will share three thoughts which I am sure have been essential in our success.

  1. She is my best friend. This may seem a little silly, but it’s true. I don’t use that term frequently… at all. Ronda is my only best friend (other than Jesus). She is the one person I would spend time with hands down everytime given the opportunity. She is the one person I would want with me no matter where I am going or what I am doing. She is my best friend.
  2. Our commitment is bigger than just us. We committed to more than just each other when we got married. We made a commitment to God. I know for a fact, it is this commitment that has saved our relationship. If the commitment was just to each other, there is always room to wiggle out of it and to allow our own sinfulness to torpedo the relationship. Bringing God into our relationship has without a doubt been the glue that has kept us together.
  3. Stubbornness. Yep, you read that right. I am certain there is some piece of Ronda (and myself) that will forever stay married to the other just so we can pridefully say we weren’t the one that gave up. I have often told Ronda, most mules have nothing on her. She will not yield her position on almost anything, just so she can win. And so will I. Of course, this is all in healthy humor. Which is the real thing, fun. We just plain have fun together. While we may frustrate and annoy each other, no one can make us laugh like we do.

Over the course of my relationship with Ronda, I have noticed she embodies and typifies Christ in ways I can only wish I do for her. She has an unwavering commitment to me that goes beyond love and devotion. It is purely supernatural in its origin. More times than not, when I see her I see Christ. In her love, I see the way Christ loves me.

We have had an incredible 17 years together and I can’t wait for 17 more.

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